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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 15, 1999

Ryan Signs Legislation Addressing Domestic Abuse, Drug Abuse and Sexual Abuse Crimes

WHEATON -- Governor George H. Ryan today signed 12 crime bills keeping his pledge to address the root causes of violence in society which include domestic abuse, drug abuse and sexual abuse.

"Through these bills, we are able to enhance penalties for domestic battery to free victims from the cycle of violence. We'll reduce the red tape so that parents live up to their responsibility, and close the door on drunk drivers hiding in law books behind legal loopholes so that out-of-state DUI offenses will no longer be ignored," Ryan explained.

"To the lawbreakers, the gang bangers, deadbeat parents, sexual predators, spouse abusers, drunk drivers, you've been warned," Ryan said. "When I introduced my anti-crime package last fall, we let you know what we wanted to do. We gave you a clue. Today, we did it!"

Ryan recognized the efforts of State's Attorney Joe Birkett, who spearheaded the passage of 11 of the bills, which were signed at a ceremony at the DuPage County Courthouse.

Legislation signed today included:

  • House Bill 1759-increases penalties to a Class 4 felony for violation of an order of protection if a person has any prior conviction for aggravated battery, stalking, aggravated stalking, unlawful restraint, or aggravated unlawful restraint when any of these offenses have been committed against a family or household member. Rep. Anne Zickus, R-Palos Hills, and Sen. Christine Radogno, R-LaGrange are the bill's chief sponsors. The bill is effective Oct. 1, 1999.

  • House Bill 1774-expedites the process for issuing a notice in order to hold the obligor in contempt for failure to make child support payments by allowing notices to be delivered by personal service or prepaid regular mail at the obligor's last known address. Rep. Patti Bellock, R-Hinsdale, and Sen. Doris Karpiel, R-Carol Stream, are the bill's chief sponsors. The bill is effective immediately.

  • House Bill 1813-removes a loophole in Illinois law that let drivers get supervision for a DUI conviction out-of-state and a second chance with supervision for additional DUI convictions here in the state. Under the new law, defendants charged with driving under the influence who were previously convicted, or received supervision for DUI or reckless driving charges, may not receive supervision again. Rep. Eileen Lyons, R-Western Springs, and Sen. Radogno were chief sponsors. The bill is effective Jan. 1, 2000.

  • Senate Bill 404-increases peeping tom and public indecency penalties by making it a Class 4 felony for three or more public indecency offenses. The bill also increases a first conviction for this form of disorderly conduct from Class B to a Class A misdemeanor. Rep. Jack McGuire, D-Joliet, and Sen. Kirk Dillard, R-Hinsdale, were the bill's chief sponsors. The bill is effective Jan. 1, 2000.

  • Senate Bill 405-expands the definition of sexual conduct to include any transfer of semen by the accused upon any part of the clothes or unclothed body of the victim for the purpose of sexual gratification or arousal of the victim or the accused. Rep. Jim Durkin, R-Westchester, and Sen. Dillard were chief sponsors. The bill is effective Jan. 1, 2000.

  • Senate Bill 485-removes "good time" behavior benefits for county jail inmates if convicted of criminal sexual abuse, aggravated criminal sexual abuse, or criminal sexual assault in which the victim was under 18 years of age at the time of the offense and the victim was a family member. Rep. Edgar Lopez, D-Chicago, and Sen. Ed Petka, R-Plainfield, were the bill's chief sponsors. The bill is effective immediately.

  • Senate Bill 486-creates a Class 4 felony charge for convictions of theft of property not exceeding $300, other than a firearm, if that person has been previously convicted of forgery, unlawful use of credit/debit cards, or possession of a stolen or converted motor vehicle. Rep. Andrea Moore, R-Libertyville, and Sen. Adeline Geo-Karis, R-Zion, were the chief sponsors. The bill is effective immediately.

  • Senate Bill 503-allows the court to impose an extended sentence on defendants who were 17 years old or older at the time of the crime, who is convicted of a felony and has been previously adjudicated as a minor for a felony within the last 10 years. Rep. Bill O'Connor, R-Riverside, and Sen. Dan Cronin, R-Elmhurst were the chief sponsors. The bill is effective Jan. 1, 2000.

  • Senate Bill 504-allows the court to impose an extended sentence upon an offender who is at least 17 years old convicted of predatory criminal sexual assault of a child. Rep. Edward Acevedo, D-Chicago, and Sen. Cronin were the chief sponsors. The bill is effective immediately.

  • Senate Bill 509-expands the provisions of heinous battery, increases the penalty for possession of explosives, adds the offense of aggravated battery and aggravated discharge of a machine gun/silencer, and adds the offense of possession of deadly substance to the criminal code. Rep. Lyons and Sen. Dillard were chief sponsors. The bill is effective immediately.

  • Senate Bill 735-doubles the sentencing range for reckless homicide in cases that the defendant was under the influence of drugs or alcohol, and when more than one person was killed as a result of the offender's actions. Rep. Randy Hultgren, R-Wheaton, and Sen. Larry Bomke, R-Springfield, were chief sponsors. The bill is effective Jan. 1, 2000.

  • Senate Bill 784-says that the 120-day period in which a person held in custody must be tried, must be on continuous period of incarceration. Separate periods of incarceration may not be combined when computing the 120-day term. Rep. Tom Cross, R-Oswego, and Sen. Dillard were chief sponsors. The bill is effective Jan. 1, 2000.

    "We must also thank Attorney General Jim Ryan, legislators and local officials for fighting for these initiatives which serve the protect all of us by ensuring that criminals are put away, locked away, and kept away in the name of public safety," Ryan added.


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